r/ProgrammerHumor Mar 29 '23

Sometimes the apps you make don't work out Meme

https://imgur.com/a/nstwTDh
423 Upvotes

115

u/Who_GNU Mar 29 '23

Chat with built-in translations already exists, but I presume the challenge was writing something that could handle: "Wtf wdym. Thats cap ik u love me"

30

u/Pradfanne Mar 29 '23

Isn't that just another level of translation

34

u/lumpia-papii Mar 29 '23

Mom’s definitely not bing chilling

18

u/TristanaRiggle Mar 30 '23

Why does he need a translation app to talk to his mom?

16

u/nomaxx117 Mar 30 '23 edited Mar 30 '23

It's not uncommon for first-generation families to have a language barrier between the parents and the children. The parents may speak limited English, but the kids may know little to none of their parent's language.

18

u/mortalitylost Mar 30 '23

That's cap ik u love me

4

u/syzygysm Mar 30 '23

Most of the of the people I know basically just learned the part of their parents' language that is involved in verbal abuse.

Like they know how to say "hello" and "no, you stupid cow!"

4

u/Madk81 Mar 30 '23

How on earth does this happen? Parents are supposed to teach their language to their kids, how can anyone fail at this?

6

u/Tar0 Mar 30 '23

Personal anecdote here, my immigrant parents taught me how to read/write english but never had time/energy to teach reading in their native language. A lot of first gen immigrant kids can understand their parents' native language verbally but never got around to learning the written language.

5

u/Madk81 Mar 30 '23

Thats... a bit sad. Feels like a monumental loss of culture.

Our ancestors are spanish (south america) and we live in france. The new generation in our family can speak and write in english, french and spanish. They certainly make many mistakes when they speak, but considering theyre between 12 and 17 years old, we see that as completely normal. There arent any spanish speakers around us anyways.

Where are your parents from? And are you living in the US?

3

u/Tar0 Mar 30 '23

My parents came from Vietnam when they were ~18-19. I'm 30 born and raised in the US now and have since learned how to read/write Vietnamese as an adult but my siblings haven't because they didn't care to. It's great that your family is so multi-lingual though! Vietnamese is a relatively uncommon language on the planet is why I suspect a lot of kids in my generation weren't explicitly taught it, in my anecdotal experience, most parents were trying to get by after being refugees.

2

u/Madk81 Mar 30 '23

I get the feeling that in the US, theres this insane need to fit in so as not to be discriminated against. I heard stories about immigrants not speaking their mother tongue at home, so their kids can fully "integrate" in the new country. Its difficult for me to believe people actually do that, its just cultural genocide if you ask me. Murica stuff, I guess?

Btw, my wife is Viet, and we plan on living in VN in the future, so im going to have to learn that one sooner or later xD The sounds are so complicated that im not really looking forward to that lol

1

u/Tar0 Mar 30 '23

Tonal languages are fun! IMO Vietnamese is a lot easier to learn than other asian languages if you come from a roman alphabet background. Due to french colonialism, the Vietnamese alphabet is the roman alphabet with accents on it to tell you how to pronounce letters!

1

u/TristanaRiggle Mar 30 '23

Sure, but if the taught you English they can/should be able to speak to you IN ENGLISH. I get that there are many kids that don't learn their parents' former language, but if the parents don't use a language the kids understand then that's intentional by the parents IMO.

1

u/Tar0 Mar 30 '23

Everyone is different but I imagine it is just a comfort thing, writing messages in your native language just tends to be easier than the next one you pick up and so on. OP's parent here is possibly just testing out the app :P but it would be great if everyone could write in the dialect they feel most comfortable with and still understand eachother.

1

u/TristanaRiggle Mar 30 '23

I 100% see the value of the idea, I just thought it was weird to use it with your "mom".

1

u/Able_Persimmon_7732 Mar 30 '23

That's partially true. Learning a language as a child requires exposure. However, the child must feel like they need to use it too. So let's say their father speaks some Mandarin but fluent English, the mother speaks some English but fluent Mandarin, and everyone else in their community (at school, down the street, at shops) speaks English, all media (signs, books, shows, music, etc) are written in English. In that circumstance it makes sense that the child would speak fluent English, and may have alright to decent comprehension of spoken and written Mandarin but might be very limited in their speaking and writing of Mandarin (this would depend on their exposure and how much they were encouraged to use it). Even if the child were encouraged to learn it, the child would default to English as it's the primary language used by everyone.

If Mandarin was only used at home and English was used outside of the home, the child would probably be fluent in both however would eventually default to English if it's the primary language of the community.

27

u/HoboHash Mar 29 '23

emotional damage !

6

u/AbsentDragon Mar 30 '23

I only attract bugs

Damn mosquitoes

4

u/DefinitelyNot42 Mar 29 '23

She's not wrong.

2

u/Environmental_Bus507 Mar 30 '23

You succeeded. But at what cost?

1

u/Tierceletus Mar 30 '23

At the risk of missing the joke and harhar social credit -10000, I call bs. The grammer and wording is SUPER obviously machine translated from the english below. No sane chinese person ever talks like this.

0

u/BlackstockTy476 Mar 31 '23

The App is called "Binko Chat" for those curious